24/02/2017 – Delectably Dead

It has been a long time since I last saw or heard anything from the depths of Southend as Hide and Shriek went silent shortly after their Halloween plans, which had me a little worried as there’s very little in the way of haunts down in Essex and they’re one of my favourite event organisers, so when Delectably Dead came onto my radar, I was all over that like a zombie on brains!

From what I knew about the show before entering, I knew it was going to be a mix of theatre and dinner at the same time. I did one in Disneyland or something years back that was themed to cowboys and you got served dinner whilst stuntmen did acrobatics and all sorts on horseback, so I was kinda basing my judgement on that: I wasn’t wrong, but I wasn’t right either.

Upon arrival, it was clear that the intent was to completely immerse you from the second you stepped into the event. We were served drinks in the function room next to the room Delectably Dead was hosted which had caution tape wrapped around pillars and amusing signs dotted around the walls, and when the main doors opened we were given a little booklet that we had to fill out which was also riddled with Hide and Shriek humour (which I absolutely love).

Once we had filled out our rations booklet, we took our seats on our designated table, which was unfortunately further away from the stage than I had liked but we can’t win it all, I guess? Anyway. Looking around the room at the theming on the tables, in the rations book, and on the screens dotted about the place, it was clear that there was a lot of inspiration from the Fallout game series which I highly commended and actually got loads of positive feedback from friends when I showed them the pictures. If you can imagine sitting at a diner with caution tape stuck to the tablecloth whilst hanging industrial/miner lights flickered on and off to simulate being run off a generator, whilst 1940s/1950s-esque music played on repeat in the background and the characters wandering around whilst introducing themselves to you, you’d kinda get the bizarre mixture of haunt meets dining experience feeling.

The room filled up to the brink with a bizarre demographic: the ages ranged from their teens right through to their 40s and maybe 50s, wearing either t-shirt and trousers or smart casual. It was clear that it had bought the dining experience crowd and the horror/haunt crowd together in a room for an evening, which was absolutely lovely as we found ourselves making fantastic friends with people dotted all throughout the room during the course of the event.

Soon enough, it was showtime! The characters all popped into action and the generic zombie story began, with lots of thrills and spills, and a surprising amount of violence and rude language, which was surprising seeing as the other Hide and Shriek events I had been to definitely lacked these – definitely not a negative point as all the actions and language had its reason to be there. Not long after the show began, we got treated to Hide and Shriek’s trademark introduction video (I won’t lie, I was looking forward to this). For those that have never been to a Hide and Shriek event, it’s basically the generic safety briefing you get just as you’re about to enter a haunt (don’t touch the actors, they might touch you blah blah blah) but done in the style of the show, with lots of humour. I really and truly hope they never get bored of these, because I absolutely love them!

 

I guess this is the bit where the it gets tough to write about the event because it wasn’t a haunt, it wasn’t immersive theatre, it was a dining experience. For those that don’t know what that is (I didn’t know until 24 hours ago either), it’s basically a theatre show with a number of intervals dotted throughout in which you get given a chance to eat, go to the loo, top up your drink, have a smoke, etc. As someone who came from a haunt/theatre perspective, it really didn’t work for me – it felt like just as we were getting immersed in the show, we were ripped away from it to eat.

In my opinion, there were three different factors that ruined the experience for me. I’m not including the immersion issue above as that’s not an issue with the show per se, it’s my expectations coming from the haunt/theatre scene as opposed to faults in the show.

The first is the volume of the actors: whilst they did well to project their voices so that the ~200+ people could hear them, it was nigh on impossible to hear and understand what was going on through entire scenes in some cases due to the positioning of the actors and the general background noise (and not-so background noise, in some cases) from the audience. I’d suggest radio throat mics that hooked into the same PA system the projector and TVs were using.

The second is alcohol. I get that it’s nice to have a drink when you’re out at a theatre show, but there were some incredibly drunk people there that were yelling at inappropriate moments and generally treating it as if it were a pub, which the actors tried to combat but drunks are just complete and utter cunts at times, and none were more cunty than the cunt that was sat on our table yelling out the most vile shit I’d only expect at a Britain First rally. The actor receiving the abuse dealt with it in a fantastic manner and manged to keep himself composed extremely well, but fuck me I have no idea how she woke up this morning with just a hangover! The worst bit is, there were bouncers at the only entrance to the room that should have seen she was just getting drunker and louder as the event progressed and could have stopped her from re-entering the room for being too drunk, but all they did was give her a warning. I get that she had spent money to be there, but so had another 200 odd people and the last thing we wanted was to hear a load of racist bollocks instead of the show. I’d have either had a dry event or limit the alcohol to a bottle of wine between two people, with the bottles sat on the table, and then the bar open at the end. This could have potentially saved the actors from having to scream and yell so much that they were getting hoarse voices by the end of the show.

The third point is the number of people. Where we were sat (Zone E) was the opposite side of the room from where the action was taking place. With the two factors above and having a number of bodies obscuring our view, we had no idea what was going on and honestly started getting bored of sitting there trying to figure out what was going on, and only a handful of times would an actor come by our table for the briefest of moments – I feel sorry for the tables that were right at the back by the bar, it’s hardly surprising that they were just drinking and having their own little fun. I’d definitely consider having the number of tables one row, or maybe two rows, deep so that everyone is included in the show and it’s easier to follow.

 

 

Moving onto the positives of the show, the amount of detail in the very minimalist scenery was incredible – the posters that I mentioned in the bar were placed in the advertisement spaces in the loos, the little jokes on the ration book and in the intro video, the little stickers on the food, it all had something amusing that related to the apocalypse and zombies, and really added to the dining experience side of the event.

Also, from what I could hear I’d honestly say that without the dining experience bit and with the right crowd, this would have been a really tense and gripping piece of horror/thriller theatre. The combination of live actors and video really meshed well together, and really pulled off the horror tropes and paid homages to pioneering people and movies well. Sure it’s “another zombie show”, but the level of dedication the actors poured into their characters was so high that it would have been easy to have believed everything they said and for it to feel like it wasn’t just “another zombie show”, which actually really made me sad that all this effort was poured into the show only for it to be ruined because it felt like people couldn’t give a fuck about the show.

 

On reflection, I’m happy to chalk this down to a bad audience as all the other Hide and Shriek events I’ve attended have received nothing but praise from me in the past, though I don’t think I’ll be returning to another horror dining experience in the near future.

 

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24/02/2017 – Delectably Dead

20/11/2016 – 139 Copeland Road

Before I begin, I’d like to apologise to anyone that’s been anticipating this review, especially the cast of 139 Copeland Road: I was seriously ill for the event and just about managed to drag myself along, and since I’ve literally not had the energy to get round to writing this up.

 

Anywho, on with the review!

 

After the sheer intensity of Séance in Birmingham a few weeks earlier, 139 Copeland Road suddenly appeared on my Facebook feed, and with only a small number of likes and a rather captive backstory, I knew I had to go to it one way or another. I spoke with a few friends and managed to get tickets for the same show as my friend from Europehaunts, who frequently flies to the UK to experience the shows here. With much excitement, we counted down the days until the show.

 

As I explained above, a few days before I had a flare up (I’ve suffered from Crohn’s disease since 2014, and it’s rare for me to admit it so publicly but I very much have reason to), which included intense stomach cramps that are unbearably painful, which almost made me give up my ticket; however, I didn’t: I got dressed (readas: put clothes over my pyjamas) and headed off to 139 Copeland Road.

 

I got to Hackney Wick station and punched in the postcode on my phone, and began following the instructions, half forcing myself to just go and get it over and done with. After getting lost despite being stood right outside the venue, I bumped into the guy from Europehaunts who seemed to have his head screwed on more than me as he instantly saw the venue: a derelict house.

 

We approached 137 Copeland Road, showed our tickets, and were let inside, where we were greeted by the sights of a completely gutted house, an absolute skeleton of what we’d consider a building. Music wafted through the air while floodlights splashed light across the walls, which were decorated with newspaper articles, pictures, police enquiries, and all sorts of information about seances and the family that lived there.

An eccentric man dressed as if he had stepped out of a steampunk fantasy novel explained the story of 139 Copeland Road: Mary, a single mother of two, had been living at 139 Copeland Road. She had been a school teacher, a much loved figure in the community. One night in 1974 however, a house fire led to Mary and her two boys burning to their deaths. The bodies were never recovered. Since then, the house has stood empty, partly due to the derelict state, but even more so because of the rumours. The sightings.

As soon as he wrapped up the story we were led into 139 Copeland Road, which was just as derelict, if not moreso, than the building we had just come from, and even upon entering there was something not quite right about the house. We were invited to take a seat at a table that had a lightbulb dangling from the rafters above, dimly lighting what felt like would have been the living room before the fire, whilst the Medium set up the seance with an offering of food, candles, and a picture of Mary, whom we were trying to contact. The light dangling above the table was turned off, leaving us bathed in the light of the three candles. We all joined hands, and the seance began.

Over the course of the next half hour, all of us at the show were completely encapsulated in the seance; lights would flicker, objects would vibrate and shake, and even though at a subconscious level I knew it was fake, I could have sworn there was someone stood directly behind me, staring at the back of my neck – something that Europehaunts also felt.

We found ourselves rushing around this decrepit house, our paths lit only by two of the smallest and dimmest torches ever, as we try to unravel the secrets that 139 Copeland Road held: we soon learned that the fire was no accident, and there was something much darker and sinister lurking in the shadows.

Though that entity sure wasn’t the only thing to be hidden in the shadows: there were points where we were plunged into pitch black, huddled in a corner as all sorts of noises rattled around us, making everyone feel claustrophobic. In one room, we were stood with a faint ticking noise that grew louder and louder from the loft, which became more and more consuming the louder it got – the ticking was the most intense and attention grabbing noise I’ve ever heard in my life, then it stopped. We all stood there in absolute silence, waiting.

As the show drew to a close, the experience became more intense still, as the guy who set the scene ended up disappearing in front of our very eyes, and we were chased out of the building by a roar that somehow chased us all down the stairs: the finale, an absolutely mindblowing scene that used the chaos as a perfect cover to transport items from where we were to the sinister entity more than 10 feet away from us, which was incredibly impressive. We were soon chased out of 139 Copeland Road and onto the streets, where we all took a moment to sigh and decompress before laughing at how immersed and scared we all were.

 

Well, what can I say? This has to be one of the best pieces of immersive theatre I’ve ever experienced – I don’t usually get sucked into a story within 10 minutes of the show starting but this got me perfectly – I even forgot that I was in pain for the entire show, which is absolutely incredible!

Despite there being only a handful of actors, each one played their parts perfectly – the Medium did a fantastic job of acting exactly like Mediums do on Most Haunted and the like, the guy that set the scene was really easy to listen to and believe, and the plant that I suspected was a plant at the beginning actually had me fooled once the seance began, and the sinister entity used the strobes perfectly to seemingly glide across the room at numerous moments in the event (though a black zentai suit would have been a bit creepier).

Considering the only effects that were used were flickering lights and speakers (probably triggered from 137 Copeland Road), the company behind the show were able to quickly and effectively suspend reality and create an entire world within the walls of that house. I’m glad that I forced myself to go despite being ill, as I know I wouldn’t have forgiven myself for not going.

One eensy-weensy criticism was that the speakers in the bedroom and living room were easily visible (if you knew where you were looking) and the two strobelights used at the end could have been moved so that they were hidden behind the beam where the dividing wall was (can’t explain it any better unfortunately – sorry!).

I look forward to hopefully seeing more from the creators of 139 Copeland Road, as they are definitely hitting the nail on the head when it comes to immersive theatre.

 

20/11/2016 – 139 Copeland Road

27/08/2016 -Snuffhouse: After Dark

Still reeling from my experiences at Cracked a few weeks earlier, an announcement was made during the ScareCON ball: Russ McKamey (the creator of the infamous McKamey Manor) would be teaming up with AtmosFEAR to bring the Manor experience to the UK under the name Snuffhouse: After Dark. As soon as tickets were released, I bought mine; I received an email a week or so later that linked me to an online form that asked me all about my fears, inviting me to be as honest and open as possible, even asking me if I’d be home on a specific date at a specific time – that truly made me question what exactly I was getting myself into.

The weeks rolled past and, between work, other haunts, and my trip to Florida (which was absolutely AMAZBALLS), I completely forgot about Snuffhouse: we had no further contact through email, on the Facebook page, on our mobiles, nowhere. Nothing even happened on the date they asked if we’d be free; it got to a point 2 weeks beforehand that I was convinced it had been canned.

Fortunately, it hadn’t, and the forst groups went through!

As the shows approached we learned that they’d be livestreaming part of the event on Facebook, and viewers would have the opportunity to vote for the sufferer they wanted to have “extra treatment”. This was unnerving, but honestly one of the best ideas I’ve heard for a haunt – it’d let others take a sneak peek into what an extreme haunt would look like! I eagerly awaited the livestream of the event before me as I knew a load of friends and Cracked contestants (and survivors) were taking part and I kinda wanted to give them hell (sorry guys! (I’m not really sorry)). One by one, their hoods came off and… they seemed in better shape than I thought.

2am hit (the finish time for Snuffhouse) and I messaged all of them asking what they thought; they knew not to tell me anything, but they all unanimously said they were bored – even someone who had never done an extreme haunt said it was boring! I was highly disappointed in what they had to say (read Europehaunt’s review here), but was secretly glad I’d actually be able to see everything.

 

Oh how I was wrong.

 

We arrived at Scare Kingdom and were greeted by some rather friendly backstage crew who advised us to park up and remain in our car. Once everyone arrived (well, almost everyone), we were asked to sign our waivers before being led to some toilets for our “last” toilet break before we were made to line up facing a bush. Hoods were placed over our heads and the experience began.

 

We were led to a room with a projection screen and made to kneel. A video of our host, Russ McKamey, appeared on the screen in front of us and introduced us to his Tormentors, then immediately started the psychological mind games. The video ended and we were made to adopt a stress position whilst the Tormentors intimidated and began to slowly chip away at our minds.

 

The video came back on, and we were split up into two groups to do our first task. We were hooded once again and led through the Scare Kingdom boo haunts to our first challenge that was designed to physically wear us down. I got punished for not following instructions completely, so combining that with all the jumping and dancing around like witches at a bonfire in the tales of olde in nothing but my shoes, I was definitely breathing hard.

 

We returned to the same room and got split up into two groups again, this time to do a mental game whilst holding stress positions. I was definitely having trouble keeping up with everything that was going on, and even this most basic of basic challenges had me questioning whether or not I could keep going – the Tormentors had already got inside my head and I hadn’t even noticed!

 

We returned back to the room and got split up again. We were led off to do a second even more psychological game that turned everyone on themselves, and left me facing off against another three Sufferers; they all said I was untrustworthy, so I threw them under the bus in a heartbeat… they did not smell very nice after that! (guys if you’re reading this I’m really sorry!)

 

We returned back to the first room and held a few more stress positions and got berated with insults by the Tormentors (I swear Blue never left my side and he was a complete arsehole) before we finally found out it was midnight – it was livestream time! Our hoods came off one by one and we had three bright lights shone in our eyes. We waited on our knees for someone to be chosen, and I half expected it to be me, but thankfully it wasn’t – I was so tired that I don’t think I could have done any more. Once the chosen Sufferer was led off, we were told that we’d be facing off against each other.

 

We were led off again then made to hold stress positions once again. After maybe 3 minutes, I safeworded and was immediately removed from the experience for the first time.

As with any experience that’s this intense, aftercare is absolutely paramount! I was taken outside to get some fresh air and get some water in me. The backstage crew I was with were very friendly and jolly and talked me down – it was definitely appreciated, but in all honesty I’d have been absolutely fine sat next to Sufferer 5. Once I was ready to go back in I was told that because I had left, I had broken the psychology behind the event. I re-joined the group and began adopting stress positions which broke me almost instantly: safewording and leaving the event for 5 minutes was enough to ruin the rest of the event. I safeworded again and received aftercare again – we did breathing exercises to lower my heart rate before I was sat up and asked if I wanted to continue. I explained that because I had already broken the illusion I wasn’t really enjoying it any more – my tour ended after 2 hours 45 minutes.

I stood around in the car park waiting for the tour to end to see how they ended up, and they all seemed pretty in tact still; from a spectator view, even though I could kinda see where the ending was going, it looked pretty lame. We had decompression time with Jason Karl and a few backstage crew who explained that they had special training and used specialist tips and techniques before we all went our own way.

 

Overall, I was rather surprised at the experience: after having feedback from those that went the week before, it was obvious that our tour had really been amped up: we were forcefully moved about and basically treated like rag dolls the entire time physically whilst being degraded verbally. There was a lot more psychology going on in there than I thought which is definitely appreciated; I did raise a concern with one of the games, though personally, I was ok and went along with it anyway.

 

Whilst it isn’t the most extreme attraction the UK has to offer, it’s definitely up there! If you’re looking to enter the extreme side of the haunt world, this would be the best event to go to. With a few tweaks and maybe a little more theatre in the vein of the old McKamey Manor extreme boo haunts they did a few years back, they’d have a really strong attraction that fills a gap in the market.

27/08/2016 -Snuffhouse: After Dark

11/06/2016 – Twisted Attractions

Not even a month has passed since our last haunts at ScareCON and I gotta admit, a number of us were itching to get ourselves to another as soon as possible! We pulled together a quick 300 mile round trip to Twisted Attractions in Birmingham from Essex to do Coulrophobia and  Dr Hades Fear Theatre!

Unfortunately, we found out when we arrived that Dr Hades Fear Theatre was having teething problems so we didn’t get to see the show. Whilst we were disappointed, we completely understand why, and you can find out more too…

 

Coulrophobia

Whilst we were in the queue we were treated to a number of strong characters, including Dr Hades, Madame Pompadour and a rather creepy clown. Dr Hades was absolutely incredible in bringing the maniacal doctor role to life and definitely had the queue creeped out with his creepy games. Madame Pompadour a graceful and elegant character that really captured your attention. The creepy clown was, well… creepy. Evil laugh, thousand yard stare that feels like he’s staring into your soul… the whole shebang; definitely an unnerving character (and that’s coming from someone without a fear of clowns!)

Inside, the haunt is fantastic: what Phobophobia last year could have been, these guys ran with the freakshow theme (despite the name – yes, there is a clown, but it’s not a clown haunt). Expect to meet a variety of freaks on your way though!

Visually, there is a lot going on. The decor as you go through is really clever and builds up a sense of disorientation which builds more and more as the haunt progresses; we actually ended up getting completely and utterly lost at one point, and ended up doubling back on ourselves multiple times.

The characters themselves were well developed and owned by their actors – the clown in the strobe maze really worked with the strobes and owned his section, and the first character we met was just absolutely entertaining through and through.

We were informed that the maze was missing a few final touches, but when we went through it was definitely standing strongly on its own two feet; the final touches just sound like it’s only going to be better next time.

 

Dr Hades Fear Theatre

Remember when I said we didn’t get to see Dr Hades Fear Theatre? I lied a bit: the haunt is having teething problems but we were lucky enough to get a sneak preview of what to expect, and let me tell you that when it’s finished, it is going to take haunts in a whole new direction. If you’re ever in Birmingham and Dr Hades is open, you definitely need to go and see it: I’m already seriously impressed and we only got a sneaky 5 minutes!

 

Twisted Attractions is a very strong independent haunt with actors, techies, artists, and backstage crew that clearly love doing what they do, and it shows; especially in the actors improvisation throughout. If you’re ever in Birmingham and they’re open, I definitely recommend taking an hour or so to go and visit:

 

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11/06/2016 – Twisted Attractions

13/05/2016 – The Final Cut and Dead & Breakfast

Yesterday marked two very special occasions: the day that Jason Voorhees kills a load of people, and ScareCON 2016!

For those that don’t know, ScareCON is a one day convention dedicated to the world of haunted attractions, ranging from independent haunts, low budget haunts, home haunts, all the way through to the tens of thousands of pounds events held at theme parks. For one day a year everyone gets together to showcase their stuff, and this year we were lucky to have the opportunity to experience Screamland’s (Dreamland’s) The Final Cut and Dead & Breakfast!

 

The Final Cut

This haunt is themed around the silver screen, where you become the star of the show: you enter the cinema screen and are soon transported through the screen and into the movie world!

Going through the uniquely themed maze you enter a series of zones dedicated to a different classic horror movie, from werewolves through to Frankenstein, and even an electrifying Jekyll and Hyde transformation scene to close the maze

Whilst not scary, it is definitely a very jumpy maze that leaves you guessing where the scare will come from. There are some cheesy bits to it, but this doesn’t detract from the haunt – overall a very strong experience and definitely one for those that enjoy horror movies!

 

Dead and Breakfast

Leading straight on from The Final Cut was Dead and Breakfast, a more theatrical haunt with a stronger storyline.

Themed around the bombings in the 1940s, you enter the Better Days bed and breakfast and check in. You’re taken to your room and are warned of ghostly goings on, then everything starts to go wrong…

With a very clever multi-layer storyline, a load of creepy masks, and scene changes so slick you really believe you’ve moved without moving, this haunt was less jumpy and more creepy, although there were definitely some excellently executed jumpscares!

 

Both of these haunts were absolutely fantastic in their own rights, and are some of the strongest themed attractions I’ve experienced. As they lead into one another, I think Dead and Breakfast should have been first and lead into The Final Cut, though this doesn’t detract from the event. I will definitely be back to review The Paradise Foundation later this year…

 

13/05/2016 – The Final Cut and Dead & Breakfast

16/04/2016 – Hide and Shriek: Dead Centre

In a short space of time, Hide and Shriek has grown into one of the bigger boo haunts outside London and theme parks. Created in 2015, the company has gone from strength to strength in bringing an immersive horror experiences that is easily available to the masses.

With very little hype surrounding Dead Centre I had no idea what to expect from the event at all. Hints were dropped in the email we received, but absolutely nothing more than “you will be running” was given away.

I arrive at the Victoria shopping centre and flashed my ticket to security, who opened the door to the centre. Upon entering, I’m bombarded with rather creepy, almost Saw-like music and a darkened shopping centre, barricaded about 20ft in. We’re told to wait to one side for our timeslot to be called forward.

Eventually, our time approaches and we’re given a waiver to sign as well as a patient form which asks for our blood type and allergens (my favourite being human flesh). We hand back the forms and we’re immediately checked for cuts and bruises by a doctor before being moved into the first scene of the show.

As with all zombie break-outs, it starts with a virus. We’re given a more extensive test as a trio of soldiers watch over us with eagle eyes from behind masks. We all pass except for one, then everything went horribly wrong…

A medic appears from behind us and the chase is on! Remember when I said most events only require a light jog? This breaks the mold: We sprinted as fast as we could to keep up with the medic who takes us on a journey that traverses fire escape routes, car parks, service routes, and the mall itself – all of which are void of any and all life, including the undead!

The zombies were absolutely fantastic – if they weren’t jumping out at you from a hidey hole, they were lurching toward you at a disturbingly quick pace: they were also able to open doors, much to our/my surprise and horror!

After being chased across various car park levels, we find ourselves inside running back down to the ground and into a pitch black room where we had to wait for a little while, which gave us all a bit of time to get our breath back from sprinting everywhere for 20 minutes.

We’re then treated to the longest run of our lives to the Hide and Shriek shop. We’re taken into the back, guided by the medic’s rather creepy UV flashlight. We’re then handed two torches and sent on our own way through this part of the show – we had to navigate through the back corridors using only the two torches. Easy right? Nah. It wasn’t.

I was holding one of the torches and the other was in another woman’s hand, so we led the way. It started off really easy – slowly moving from room to room, peeking around each door frame before entering the room, then both of our torches malfunction: mine shuts down entirely, and the other torch would only work if you hit it. We were in almost pitch black, trying to grope our way through corridors and rooms so dark that you genuinely couldn’t see the hand in front of your face!

We made it through and met up with our medic, or rather, he found us and helped us through the rest of the blackened corridors and back to the shop floor when we realise that one of the group had gone missing! After a small, unsuccessful, search and rescue mission we’re pointed across the shopping centre floor, which was littered with a handful of zombies. Following the medics orders, we charge through a few upturned benches and through the zombies to the finishing line, to everyone’s relief.

 

I had a few minor negative points that, whilst they didn’t detract from the event all that much, I did end up questioning them on my journey home.

Firstly, the characters at the beginning of the experience definitely lacked an air of authority. We had made it to the safe house, and whilst checks were done, they were taken lightly and the doctors/nurses were joining in with jokes – I’d have expected them to be a little more stern and sterile with the signing of the waiver and showed our tickets (I’ll excuse the security guard as I couldn’t tell if he was mall staff or an actor).

Secondly, we were told that we would need to make it to the roof of the car park to wait for the pick up, but when we were taken back inside and down into the shopping centre, it wasn’t clearly explained why our destination had changed. Also, there was no explanation as to why we couldn’t just keep going up the first stairwell we reached – maybe some zombies coming down from the above levels would have killed that thought.

Thirdly, whilst the finale was new and unique (I’m far too used to being chased from behind), it definitely lacked something. I wouldn’t say it was anti-climactic, but it wasn’t as explosive as it could have been. Maybe if a handful of zombies had chased from behind as well as from the left hand side so we’re made to go the route we’re meant to, it would have been better.

Finally, the show seemed to end just as we were getting sucked into the story. I appreciate it’s hard to create a huge story in such a tight space, especially when the space is open and there’s a risk of other groups crossing paths at any time, but the 30 minutes didn’t feel like it was long enough to really get in the role.

 

HAVING SAID ALL OF THAT THOUGH, I thoroughly enjoyed myself, and it was clear to see from everyone else (including the pessimistic 14 year old whom was genuinely entertaining whist standing in the dark) that it was a fantastic event.

I have a few favourite aspects to our trip:

Firstly, the medic was a credit unto himself for remaining in a sense of panic throughout the entire event. I didn’t buy into it to begin with, but as time went by, the sense of urgency was definitely there.

Secondly, oh my God they had the ENTIRE shopping centre to play with! Do you know how awesome that is? Like that’s more space than the theme parks get! The fact that there was no obvious path through the show was definitely a treat – we were checking the door windows on all the floors to make sure no zombies would come bursting in to try and attack us.

Thirdly, what I’m nicknaming “the corridor from hell”. Having to find our way through complete and utter darkness was insanely disorientating which only made it more hellish. The two torches shutting down as they did, whether it was planned or not, definitely added to the experience! If they’re rigged in some way, they were a fantastic investment!

Finally, the scene with the chaser zombie was definitely terrifying – I rarely jump at these events, but you got me good and proper chaser zombie! (I’d write more so the directors knew which bit I’m talking about, but I don’t wanna give that bit away. Scott/George: Drop me a message if you wanna know!).

Honourable Mention: the Alien Escape poster in one of the stairwells for making that event a meta event that could have happened if the apocalypse didn’t happen. I’ve no idea if it was intended this way, but I found it hilarious.

 

All in all, I had an absolutely fantastic evening despite all the sprinting we did. Walking out of the shopping centre, I was grinning from ear to ear and absolutely buzzing off the adrenaline! An incredibly strong second show, and I’m glad that a third date was added! I will definitely be returning for all future events to see them grow from strength to strength.

 

Note: We had a group photo taken at the end of the event, so as soon as I receive that I’ll post it here. Keep your eyes peeled!

 

16/04/2016 – Hide and Shriek: Dead Centre

15/04/2016 – Secret Cinema Presents: 28 Days Later

I’ve heard a lot about Secret Cinema in the past with most, if not all, reviews being extremely positive; however, I had never wanted to visit them due to the movie selection… until now.

 

After its release almost 15 years ago, a new movie bought new life into the zombie genre by bringing Jim, a simple courier, out of a coma and into a deserted UK populated by the infected. Since then, it has grown so huge that it formed a cult following so big that Secret Cinema decided that they would explore the post-apocalyptic horror that is 28 Days Later.

 

After joining the official event, my facebook feed exploded with posts, pictures, and short clips advertising the event: I’ve followed several new pages set up just for this event that spoof some very British institutions, ran a “home test” to see if I had been infected, and even signed up on the NSH (that’s National Service of Health) website and watched (fake) news reports from the BBCC explaining what’s going on.

NSH

The day of my appointment came around. I met up with my sister who also had an appointment at the same date and time, got changed into our costume (the best bit about Secret Cinema is that you must dress up) and made our way to Canada Water station, getting odd looks from the commuters as they headed home from a hard week at work.

 

We arrive and instantly join the crowd of patients as they trickled from the station to the event. We arrive to an army-controlled environment with speakers blaring out a repeated quarantine message as we’re sent from post to post, being asked for our appointment card, having our bags checked, and being asked to put our phones in a sealed envelope (we don’t want the illusion of the apocalypse ruined!)

 

We’re handed an appointment card and got told to remember it, else we wouldn’t be admitted to the treatment centre. We’re then led inside, and the experience, our treatment, begins…

 

Secret Cinema went beyond the movie with a very clever set-up that uses effects that I have yet to see be used in boo haunts. The scenery and the actors blended well together to create a fantastic atmosphere that was easy to lose yourself in, though the large groups definitely detracted from the experience, especially if the narrator is quiet. Despite this, the guys at Secret Cinema effectively took you through some of your favourite scenes from 28 Days Later and left us feeling rather happy and amused.

 

As this is a big event that needs to be accessible to everyone, do not expect anything extreme or challenging. There are some points where it can be very tense, but there’s nothing beyond the general immersive theatre/theme park horror mazes except running, there is a lot of running.

 

All in all, despite having high expectations of it being terrifying (we had a lot of ideas that would have made it scarier), it was still a fun and enjoyable night.

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I would also like to give a huge shout out to the army personnel that helped my sister find me at the safe house – it was an absolute delight that you went above and beyond in remembering her and her description of me, and calling out to us!

 

With endless love, we left you sleeping. Now we’re sleeping with you. Don’t wake up.

15/04/2016 – Secret Cinema Presents: 28 Days Later